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First spring and summer that I will have owned this home (purchased at start of Fall last year), I live in Ohio so currently its snowing but then of course this weekend it will be in the mid 50s etc. My lawn has quite a good deal of brown/dead looking patches and I want to jump start it.

So far I've laid down an application of Scotts preem+crabgrass as of 5 weeks ago, last weekend I laid down an application of Milorganite. I'm wondering if a Starter Fertilizer would benefit me in any type of way at this point in time. I know spring isn't in full swing for me yet (as soil temps aren't consistently warm) but I'd still like to at least be armed with the knowledge.

Everyone here has been great so far, as a new homeowner its a bit daunting to understand everything for the first time. I appreciated each and every one of you so far. Please offer any insight you may have. [Side note I posted a few pictures in an attempt to ID my grass, I seemed to get the answer of a mix of Tall Fescue and KBG](https://imgur.com/a/7GZBO)? What are your thoughts?

According to The Lawn Care Nut I don't need something labeled as "Starter Fertilizer" which is a great point, but what ratio of Nitro/Phos/Potash should I be using? If anyone could recommend something that would be found at HomeDepot/Lowes that would be best.
 

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A soil test would be a good place to start to see where your N-P-K levels are as well as your PH. It looks like a local extension office offers this service for $11. They will make recommendations on liming, if needed and what type of fert to use.
https://franklin.osu.edu/program-areas/agriculture-and-natural-resources/soil-testing

For all the money you could spend on ferts and other items, this is money well spent. If you haven't already read g-mans sticky thread, I would start there.

https://thelawnforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=1595

Welcome!
 

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I wouldn't drop fertilizer until the you've mowed the grass at least 2x. Otherwise you risk forcing top growth.

Typically a 3-1-2/4-1-2 ratio fertilizer for turf would suffice. But as stated above, who really knows what nutrients you need without a soil test? Nitrogen promotes growth, you will typically find high nitrogen fertilizers (first number) at the big box stores. Probably any of the lawn/turf fertilizers will be ok for your purpose.

I love Milorganite, but it's likely not warm enough for the microbes to digest/use it yet in your area. If you're into organics you might also look at alfalfa, cracked corn, etc once it warms up.
 
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