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I know a few of you are masters of this culinary art.

Me?... I'm just a guy that prefers the taste of grilled meat.

I grilled some chicken with Dillo Dust dry rub Sunday, can't think of a better way to end a long day of lawn work!

 

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J_nick said:
I've been smoking these for 6 hours now! Time to eat
Looks pretty good to me Jnick!

We had my wife's family over for her dads b-day. I picked up a whole beef tenderloin from Costco and broke it down in to some filets. I did a reverse sear - cooked until internal was around 120 and then got the grill up to 500 degrees for searing. The wife made some blue cheese herb butter which was amazing.

The Cook:


Final:
 

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SGrabs33 said:
We had my wife's family over for her dads b-day. I picked up a whole beef tenderloin from Costco and broke it down in to some filets. I did a reverse sear - cooked until internal was around 120 and then got the grill up to 500 degrees for searing. The wife made some blue cheese herb butter which was amazing.

The Cook:


Final:
This could have been my house on a different day. Our primary go to steak is the Costco Tenderloin. I slice it up into 1.5" thick cuts. I then cut up the leftovers from the tapered ends and skewer them for the kids.

I just recently learned about the reverse-sear and can't wait to try it.

I would also love to get the recipe for the blue cheese herb butter. I've made herb butter before, but never tried incorporating blue cheese.
 

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This was the first time I tried butchering the tenderloin myself and it was pretty easy. You don't have any recommendations on cooking the other parts of the tenderloin(other than the filet) do you?

I probably ate 3/4 of a stick of butter last night :eek:
Here you go: Blue Cheese Butter
 

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Thanks for the blue cheese butter recipe. This is very similar to how I make herb butter. I make herb butter (I'm not really making butter) as follows:

  • Combine softened butter and herbs/spices in a bowel
  • Lay out a sheet of plastic wrap
  • Spoon butter/herb mixture into middle of plastic wrap making a "log" shape - The shape doesn't have to be perfect
  • Fold the plastic wrap in half so that the "log" lays in the middle
  • Grab both ends of the plastic wrap, and slowly roll the log across the counter so that you are twisting the ends closed like a candy wrapper

You may have to let some air out, but it will tighten everything up. You now have an herb-butter log. I stick mine back in the fridge for future use.

I will admit, you lost me with the filet comment. So I had to look it up. I'm still not certain which part is actually the filet, but I know which parts it obviously is not. I make "steaks" out of everything I can. I remove the small tube like piece that will obviously fall off along the smaller end of the tenderloin.

I usually will wrap the large end with bacon as it has a very similar piece that likes to come off during grilling. At times will remove this as well if he large end of the tenderloin is big enough.

Personally, I've always taken everything that wasn't large enough to be considered a steak and cut it up into golf-ball sized pieces. These get put on skewers for the kids, or occasionally I'll cook them in a cast iron skillet for myself at lunch time. (I work from home when not travelling).

You might also like this video:

 

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No, no, no... you're doing it wrong. I left out a step, it should have gone right before combining...

  • eat the butter and herbs

There is a whole physical and chemical reaction that must occur. Seriously though, I had to type that post twice because my internet stopped working. It was spelled "bowel" the first time too, but I caught it. Not sure why I'm making bowls into bowels today.
 

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I'm a BIG fan of the reverse sear. A good instant read thermometer like the Thermapen® Mk4 makes the job easier.

For the small end of the tenderloin that doesn't yield a nice size steak, a trick I've seen is to cut those twice as thick (3"), then butterfly and bacon wrap them. It basically makes a full size filet.

 

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Wes said:
I will admit, you lost me with the filet comment.
This is basically the breakdown I went with:


I pretty much cut the "small roast" section into steaks too.

Ware said:
A good instant read thermometer like the Thermapen® Mk4 makes the job easier.
I've heard great things about the ThermaPen on the EggHead Forum. I have a different instant read that I bought off of Amazon which works pretty well.

I should have thought about the butterfly approach, good idea. For the descent sized left over pieces I think I may go with kabobs and then grind the remainder into some good burgers.

Thanks everyone.
 

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Thanks for the breakdown. It's interesting that the portion your picture describes as the filet, is the same portion that the guy in video stated was the Chateau Briand.

For what it's worth, Wikipedia describes the cuts as follows:

"The three main "cuts" of the tenderloin are the butt, the center-cut, and the tail. The butt end is usually suitable for carpaccio, as the eye can be quite large; cutting a whole tenderloin into steaks of equal weight will yield proportionally very thin steaks from the butt end. The center-cut is suitable for portion-controlled steaks, as the diameter of the eye remains relatively consistent. The center-cut can yield the traditional filet mignon or tenderloin steak, as well as the Chateaubriand steak and beef Wellington. The tail, which is generally unsuitable for steaks due to size inconsistency, can be used in recipes where small pieces of a tender cut are called for, such as beef Stroganoff."

Based on this info it appears that the middle portion can be both the ChateauBriand or the the Filet. Interesting stuff! I learned something new today.

As an Egg owner, I'm a fan of the EggHead Forums as well. Another great site for all things barbecue is amazingribs.com.
 

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dfw_pilot said:
Wes said:
Another great site for all things barbecue is amazingribs.com.
+1 on AmazingRibs.com. It's THE source, especially for things like reverse sear on steaks.
Agreed! Not to mention a great review on some of the best tools. I typically always use his (Meathead Goldwyn) site to "click through" to Amazon before making a purchase of a product just to show my support of what he does.
 
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