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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,
So today my wife and I picked up three small tomato plants. One is a cherry type and the others are heirloom types (Brandywine and Cherokee Purple).
I was told to re-pot them in a larger container, around 10 gallons or so, and bury them leaving just a few inches of their top protruding from the soil.
Any thoughts on this?
Also, any trick or tips as to the soil I should use? I have access to a soil that's about 50% sand and 50% compost, which is what I'm currently using on my lawn as top dressing.
Thanks in advance for any info on this.
---BMS
 

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Tifgrand—7,500 sq/ft—Baroness LM56
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Or TexasWeed :)
 

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Tomatoes will grow in most soil types, they're a really forgiving plant. As for how deep to pot them, just put them in half an inch or so deeper than the pot they come in.

Position in the sun and keeping the water up is the most important thing when they're grown in pots. They love full sun and can dry out in a pot. Once they start growing don't be shy with the tomato dust. They also love a nice balanced NPK fertiliser. Pruning will be important with the hairloom varieties, you'll need to pick the dominant branch and ensure there's something above it to keep it from burning and nothing below. Keep the fruit to one or two branchs only for better quality. My grandfather grew tomatoes commercially for 50 years and always said to remove any dead leaves instantly and always rip them off with your hands. Any scissors/secateurs will spread disease. The cherry tomatoes won't need as much pruning.

If you're looking for something else to grow in the pot, basil is best.

Good luck and enjoy!
 

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I grow them in containers every year. I typically plant them a few inches deeper than the pot they are in. Depending on how big they are when transplanted I will pinch off te lower limbs so I can l plant them a little deeper than the limbs will allow. My Cherry Tomatoes always put out more than I can eat during growing season.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Great info, and thanks to all who shared it.

Another question, a few of the lower limbs on two of the plants are turning a bit yellowish. They're not dead (yet), but just discolored. Any ideas why this is?

Thanks again!
 

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BMS said:
Great info, and thanks to all who shared it.

Another question, a few of the lower limbs on two of the plants are turning a bit yellowish. They're not dead (yet), but just discolored. Any ideas why this is?

Thanks again!
Sounds like a fungal issue called "Early Blight." Can you post a few pictures of the areas?

Youll want to remove and dispose of those infected areas if that is indeed the issue. Then Follow up with some fungicide.
 

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The person that advised you to bury them and leave the top few inches sticking out was correct. Tomatoes will root from the stem, and so the plant will develop a very good root system to support fruit production. You can see this in action if you take suckers and place them in a cup of water - they will root in about a week and will be ready to plant in soil.

 

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Yep, they also love heat and sun, just like Bermuda. My garden gets full sun in the afternoon, it's so intense my door knob gets too hot to touch from it. Cucumber leaves roll up like a cigar, beans close their leaves, grapes turn their leaves backwards, tomatoes (and peppers) are unfazed, they just love it.
Now let's see how the KBG likes it, it is also in full blazing afternoon sun. They say it's a full sun grass, right? :D
 
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