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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Application Guide:

This handy application chart rates TeeJet nozzles for different application types. You can click on each nozzle in the left column and it will navigate you to the appropriate TeeJet catalog page.

 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
My Preferences:

I prefer an XR TeeJet for products that rely on foliar absorption. Note in the chart above that it is rated 'Excellent' for contact herbicides, fungicides, etc. Smaller droplets are generally considered better for uniform coverage on the plant leaf. However, it is not that great for drift management due to the fine droplet size, so keep that in mind on breezy days.


I prefer an AIXR TeeJet (air induction) for soil applied products like pre-emergent and wetting agents. Note in the chart above that it is rated 'Very Good' and 'Excellent' for soil applied and systemic products. It is rated 'Excellent' for drift management due to the coarse droplet size.


A good compromise between the two is the Turbo TeeJet. They are rated 'Very Good' across the board.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Some Other Considerations:

XRC and AIC nozzles are basically the same as the XR and AI, but are molded into a Quick TeeJet Cap for automatic spray alignment on a Quick TeeJet Nozzle Body. I prefer these on my Spreader-Mate, but probably prefer the regular XR/AIXR on a handheld or backpack sprayer wand because you can easily rotate them to a more comfortable orientation if you are using a 25598-*-NYR cap and gasket (which has a round hole).


TeeJet provides alternative ratings for some nozzles (Turbo TeeJet, Turbo TwinJet and XR/XRC) if you are operating below 30psi. I think this is because droplet size increases at lower presures. For example, an XR/XRC is 'Excellent' for contact products unless you are operating below 30psi - then it is only 'Good'... but becomes 'Very Good' for systemic applications and drift management.


Some TeeJet nozzles (like the XR/XRC) are produced in both 80 and 110 degree varieties (e.g. XR8004 and XR11004). This affects nozzle spacing/height recommendations if you are using a multi-nozzle boom. The 110 degree nozzles should be spaced 20" apart and 20" off the ground. The 80 degree nozzles should be spaced 20" apart and 30" off the ground. Just something to keep in mind if you are designing a boom.


The recommended strainer mesh is notated in parenthesis for each nozzle on the catalog page. For example, you should use a 50-mesh screen with the XR11004.


When ordering nozzles, the price will vary depending on the tip material. For example, the XR11004 is offered in stainless, polymer, ceramic and brass. I like the stainless ones. They are about twice the price of polymer, but I'm not ordering in quantities that would make that option cost prohibitive.



 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Nozzle Color Selection:

Once I have selected a nozzle type, there are basically two main variables I consider when choosing a nozzle color:

1) Ground speed
2) Operating pressure​

Changing either of those, along with nozzle color, will change your application rate. To decide on an application rate, you'll want to take into consideration things like:

1) Product-specific dilution requirements
2) Size of the area being sprayed
3) Sprayer tank capacity
4) Number of refills required​

Example:

Let's say I'm wanting to use an XR TeeJet and the product I'm spraying calls for a minimum of one gallon of carrier (water) per thousand square feet. I have a yellow (XR11002), a blue (XR11003), and a red (XR11004) on hand.

Rather than focus on one variable at a time, I use the chart and sort of massage my way into a solution. I know I naturally push my sprayer around 2.5 mph and the nozzle performs well at about 40psi, so I start by looking at the 40psi line for each of the three nozzles I have to see how many gallons per thousand square feet they will spray at 2.5 mph. This requires some minor interpolation, but I learn that under those conditions the yellow nozzle will give me about 0.56 gallons per thousand, the blue nozzle will give me about 0.84 gallons per thousand, and the red nozzle will give me about 1.16 gallons per thousand... so I would choose the red nozzle.

Alternatively, I could use the blue nozzle and either increase the system pressure to 60psi or reduce my walking speed to around 2 mph to get above the one gallon per thousand requirement. The yellow nozzle is not a viable option in this example.

 

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Tifgrand—7,500 sq/ft—Baroness LM56
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J_nick said:
Very nice write up Ware. I'm looking to upgrade my sprayer this spring so this really helps. I have a question about the different materials the nozzles are made from. What's the difference between SS with and without the visiflo, polymer, ceramic and the brass nozzles? Why would you choose one over the other?
From my understanding while I was researching all of this when putting my Franken-Mate together, the different nozzle materials are dependent on WHAT you are spraying as some products are more abrasive than others but for the normal homeowner who isn't spraying large volumes of product you could get away with just the normal tips. The visiflo, I believe, is Tee-Jets color coded nozzles so you know the flow rate regardless which tip it is.

Great write up Ware BTW!! Very informative.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Mightyquinn said:
J_nick said:
Very nice write up Ware. I'm looking to upgrade my sprayer this spring so this really helps. I have a question about the different materials the nozzles are made from. What's the difference between SS with and without the visiflo, polymer, ceramic and the brass nozzles? Why would you choose one over the other?
From my understanding while I was researching all of this when putting my Franken-Mate together, the different nozzle materials are dependent on WHAT you are spraying as some products are more abrasive than others but for the normal homeowner who isn't spraying large volumes of product you could get away with just the normal tips. The visiflo, I believe, is Tee-Jets color coded nozzles so you know the flow rate regardless which tip it is.

Great write up Ware BTW!! Very informative.
MQ is exactly right, the various tip materials are basically a cost versus nozzle life decision. If you really want to nerd out, bookmark TeeJet's A User's Guide to Spray Nozzles for some late night reading, but to summarize what they have to say about tip materials (p. 33):

Brass materials wear quickly. A brass nozzle may have an increase in flow of 10-15% after 50 hours of use, depending on what product is being sprayed.

Polymer tips typically have a wear life 2-3x longer than brass.

Stainless tips have a wear life 4-6x longer than brass.

Ceramic tips have a wear life 20-50x longer than brass.​

It looks like Sprayer Depot has the XR11004 priced like this:

VisiFlo Brass (VB) - $4.43
VisiFlo Polymer (VP) - $2.14
VisiFlo Stainless (VS) - $4.76
VisiFlo Ceramic (VK) - $3.68​

So if nozzle life is your focus, it looks like ceramic is the clear winner, but as MQ mentioned, we're not likely to wear them out as a homeowner. I don't think you could go wrong with any of them, but I stay away from the brass. As I mentioned earlier, I usually buy the stainless. They are not cost prohibitive for the number of nozzles I purchase and I feel like they are probably more durable in the event you bump the end of the wand on something.

The VisiFlo, like MQ mentioned, is just the color-coded polymer that allows for easy identification. The XR11004-VS (VisiFlo Stainless) looks like this. Note the actual spray orifice is stainless:


A non-VisiFlo tip would look like this - just imagine sorting through a box full of these that all look the same:

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Iriasj2009 said:
Just to clear things up, when we are talking about operating pressure, if I'm using a 21psi CF, my operating pressure is 21PSI?
Yes sir. So you would want to read the 20psi line for each tip color in the table. For example, a (red) XR11004 should give you a medium droplet size (yellow M) and 1.0 gallon per thousand square feet if you walk at 2 mph.

Note that the table values are based on boom specifications of 20" between nozzles and 20" off the ground (for 110 degree nozzles)... so with a backpack or handheld it's important to remember that the table is only accurate if you're holding the nozzle 20" off the ground and spacing your passes 20" apart. That's obviously easier said than done, so the tables should really only be used as a guide - if that makes sense.

The tighter you are able to hold each variable, the more accurate your results will be. That's why a CF valve or pressure regulator is so important - that's one less variable you have to deal with.

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Something else that is nice about about the VisiFlo color codes is that the rated flow for each color translates between nozzle styles. In other words, a red XR TeeJet has the same flow specs as a red AI TeeJet - so re-calibration is not necessary if you swap for a different style nozzle, but maintain the same color. This makes for an easy transition if you are spraying both contact and systemic products.

Let's break down a couple different nozzle part numbers:


XR11004-VS

This is a red XR TeeJet (XR) with a 110 degree pattern (110) that flows 0.40 GPM at 40 psi (04). The VS suffix means it is a VisiFlo Stainless tip.


AI11004-VS

This is a red AI TeeJet (AI) with a 110 degree pattern (110) that flows 0.40 GPM at 40 psi (04). The VS suffix means it is a VisiFlo Stainless tip.

So the "04" in the part number tells you that it is designed to flow 0.40 GPM at 40 psi. Similarly, an XR11003-VS is designed to flow 0.30 GPM at 40 psi.
 

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Great information ware, thank you, helps a lot. I'm trying to take my lawn to the next level this year and I need to get everything right. Last year I overapplied a PGR on established celebration by using my cheap setup and it really hurt the turf..
 

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Tifgrand—7,500 sq/ft—Baroness LM56
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I never knew someone could get this nerdy about spray tips :) Good info nonetheless!!!
 

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Tifgrand—7,500 sq/ft—Baroness LM56
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Ware said:
Mightyquinn said:
I never knew someone could get this nerdy about spray tips :) Good info nonetheless!!!
Ha, keep in mind all of this nozzle talk is ancillary to having a nice dfw_wand and/or sprayer rig.

By the way, we need to see some pictures of your Franken-Sprayer. :D
Done!
 

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Tifgrand—7,500 sq/ft—Baroness LM56
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I would just like to add that this is the set up I use on my Franken-Sprayer-Mate.

I prefer the Teejet Turbo Induction Flat for all my soil applied products such as Prodiamine, Wetting Agents and Insecticides. I like the course spray and that it's not as affected by wind as much.


I prefer the Teejet Turbo Wide Angle Flat Tip for all my foliar applications such as Primo Maxx, Ferrous Ammonium Sulfate and Celsius as it has a smaller droplet size but still has good drift management.


For spot spraying weeds with Celsius, I like to use Teejet XR in Green as it has a lower flow rate than the red tips and gives you a nice even flat spray. This will also help prevent over application as all you need to do is "wet" the weed and not saturate it.


Whenever I am done with the Franken-Sprayer, I usually have some product left over, so I will pour it into my 2 Gallon Gilmour Sprayer and finish spraying. I like to use Teejet XR in Red especially with my Primo/Ferrous Ammonium Sulfate mix to go back over all my "trimming" areas along the fence, house and sidewalk/driveway. It helps give it longer control in those areas.


I just recently found this Teejet Adjustable Cone Tip when I purchased a Stihl SG 11 hand sprayer(I will try to do a review on it later) and it only came with a misting tip. The Teejet Cone Tip screws on perfectly to the Stihl and gives you a quality adjustable tip and it has the 11/16" Teejet threads so it should screw on to the DFW Wand without any issues.

 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
GrassDaddy said:
Well that's a lot to think about. I just got the 20v backpack sprayer and need to figure out what tips to use with it now. I thought it would be simpler but that's a lot of variables lol
There is a lot of information above, but I would break it down or simplify it like this:

  1. Figure out which color nozzle produces your desired flow (e.g. 1gal per thousand).
  2. Order a nozzle rated excellent for contact products and a nozzle rated excellent for systemic products in that color.

I really only use two nozzle styles - a red XR/XRC (for contact products) and a red AI/AIC (for systemic products).
 

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CH3NO2 said:
Are teejet fittings compatible with Solo wand thread sizes?
Yes, they are!! I know because I have replaced the wand on my Gilmour Sprayer with a Solo and I just bought a Solo 456 Sprayer and they fit just fine. The threads are the same and the tips will fit on the end too. You just have to remove the blue metal strainer first.
 
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