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I've seen people posting Logan lab results, but is anyone able to help with Soil Savy results?
I submitted a soil sample to soil savvy lab and here are the results.

Iowa 5b

This is a well established lawn of many years which consist of Kentucky Bluegrass, rye grass and fine fescue.I will be getting another soil sample from the state of Iowa this fall but was wondering if anyone could help me with these results to get a jump start.I'm new at looking at these results and from the best of my knowledge it looks like im low on iron?? Any help would be greatly appreciated..
 

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Soil Savvy tests do not report an accurate pH and even say so on the next page. Their fertilizer recommendation is for one month only and supplies 1/2 lb of the nutrients (unless they mean for you to use both the synthetic and organic--and what organic has 5-5-5?). What good is a one month recommendation? Your Iowa test should show your total shortage of P and K and from that you can devise a fertilizer plan to supply the deficits. All you know from this is "slightly low." Summer, by the way, is not the time to fertilize cool season grass with nitrogen. Wait until mid August, which is considered early fall. A normal fertilizer application supplies 1 lb/k of whatever nutrients you're adding. What I would be concerned about is that magnesium is higher than calcium. Calcium is normally much higher than magnesium. The Iowa test should give more detail (and hopefully the base saturation percentages). Alkaline soils tend to be low on iron and phosphorus. Milorganite has chelated iron and it has a good amount of phosphorus. You should use that when you fertilize in the spring and early fall. The soil needs to be warm enough for microbes to be active. There are also foliar sprays for iron and other sources for phosphorus, but there are advantages in using an organic phosphorus in an alkaline soil where phosphorus will bind up quickly. An organic phosphorus will be consumed by the soil organisms and released as they die, so there is a slow, more or less steady release.
 

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One thing I will add (I couldn't make out the ppm numbers here but saw them better on GW), the calcium/magnesium situation isn't as bad as I thought. You have more calcium than magnesium. The magnesium is just higher than it ought to be. I don't know what extractant they're using and the ppm numbers are meaningless for making recommendations unless you know that. Adding calcium in the form of gypsum would bring calcium up and bring magnesium down. How much? I don't know. Why don't you call Soil Savvy and ask them about the calcium/magnesium situation. On second thought, I would trust Iowa to give better advice
 
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