Lawn Care Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any product suggestions for me?


Noticed the ca and mg are high is the bad? If so how do I correct it?
Also should I mess with the PH at all or is that just fine.
What's a good macronutrientto use?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,824 Posts
This is a Soil Savvy test and is sort of useless in my opinion. Look at the fine print on the next page and it says the pH could be under reported by 0.5. The fertilizer recommendation is strange and I think it's a recommendation for a single application, not for a year like most recommendations would be. It is especially strange to recommend applying over 3 lb/k of potassium in a single application (6 Lb/k of 0-0-60 is 3.6 lb/k). As a general rule, don't apply more than 1 lb/k of a nutrient in one application. 0-0-50 would be a much better choice for potassium. Maybe you could get a test from a real lab? Most state land grant colleges offer inexpensive testing. What I can gather from this one is you need some extra potassium.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,824 Posts
On second thought, I think you can skip another test this year. This has answered some questions. Do you need lime? No. Do you need phosphorus? No. You do need some potassium. Let's assume that their recomendation is for a year, which works out to 3.6 lb/k of K2O. It that is correct, then four monthly applications of 0-0-50 (sulfate of potassium) will supply 4 lb/k. Since you have rye/KBG, you can do several nitrogen applications this fall. What do you normally use for fertilizer? How many lb/k of nitrogen do you aim for? It's not a problem to have lots of calcium and magnesium.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,824 Posts
I forgot to answer the micronutrients question. The chart says you lack manganese and zinc. When you shop for fertilizer, look for bags that say "contains micronutrients," Then look on the label to see which ones they include. If you don't find anything with manganese and zinc, don't worry about it. Grass needs only a tiny bit and, except for iron, it's rare for grass to have problems because of micronutrient deficiencies. There is usually enough in the soil.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top