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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I made some of this yesterday, poor man's Ricotta cheese. Horrible pic, I know.


My first foray into any type of cheese making. What's cool is as soon as the vinegar hits the hot milk it curdles instantly.. neat little science project.

I used this website for the info.:
http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-homemade-ricotta-cheese-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-23326
 

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Alan said:
I made some of this yesterday, poor man's Ricotta cheese. Horrible pic, I know.
Looking good :thumbup: . My grandparents(who had a cow) used to make cheese all the time. The raw milk would get poured into these gallon pottery jugs and sit for 4-5 days in a cool room to basically turn to yogurt - the raw milk apparently contains bacterial cultures, and each culture is specific to the region. The cream would "float" to the top and get skimmed off to use in cooking or making butter, and the rest heated in a large pot to turn into cheese. No vinegar necessary, the process acidifies the milk and as soon as you heat it a little it curdles. The whey then got fed to the pigs, nothing got wasted. Anyway, I tried to replicate it using the vinegar process and failed miserably - the cheese was good but sweet, as opposed to what I remembered from my childhood which was slightly sour/acidic from the "fermentation" process.

I tried to make cheese with rennet. I found out the hard way that during ultra-pasteurization and homogenization the molecules in the milk basically get destroyed and can't curdle properly to make cheese. Bummer. I need a cow :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I found another recipe for ricotta that didn't use any added acid(no lemon, no vinegar). They took the milk up to 190ºF, then took it off the heat and let it set for an hour and it curdled on its own. I guess if you add acid it just accelerates the process so you don't have to wait.

You can use pasteurized milk, but not the super pasteurized stuff. The more fat the better, so whole milk and if you so choose, you can add some heavy cream.

Generally when I look up a recipe for something I check multiple websites and try to get some kind of consistency/consensus of how to do something and the ingredients involved. I will also read peoples reviews and see if they made any changes and why they incorporated those changes.

If I didn't have the internet, I would probably eat the same old crap day in and day out. Simple stuff like peanut butter and jelly sandwiches...lol
 

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Alan said:
I found another recipe for ricotta that didn't use any added acid(no lemon, no vinegar). They took the milk up to 190ºF, then took it off the heat and let it set for an hour and it curdled on its own. I guess if you add acid it just accelerates the process so you don't have to wait.
I must have boiled milk hundreds of times in my life and I've never seen it curdle on its own, unless it was bad to start with. If you do it pics or it didn't happen :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, maybe I misspoke a little. There is buttermilk in this recipe, so maybe that's where the acid comes from??

Here's the site/cite:
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/168941/sicilian-homemade-ricotta-cheese/?internalSource=staff%20pick&referringId=16108&referringContentType=recipe%20hub&clickId=cardslot%208
 

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SGrabs33 said:
J_nick said:
Jalapeño Popper Grilled Cheese
Yes please!
Here is the recipe. I ran acrossed it on FB one day. I normally just use regular sliced cheese as we normally don't have Monterey Jack or Sharp Chedder slices. I also don't do the cilantro or Italian bread, I just use the thicker sliced "Texas toast" style bread(not the frozen kind)

 
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