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Thick n Dense said:
Bmossin said:
Deke said:
My 2cents. Coming from a carpet cleaning / restoration background. I would guess I have seen, touched, installed, and removed more flooring than 99.9% of people on the planet.

1. Real wood flooring. Preferably a hardwood. Tough to beat real hardwood. Only downfalls are cost and it's a pain to dry if it gets wet. If it does it usually takes specialized equipment to get it dry, most likely will have cupping for up to 6 months while floor re normalizes it's moisture content. And then will most likely need to be refinished.
@Deke Do you have any tips on getting wet hardwood dried out on a slab. About 3 weeks ago we had an overflow, and while I thought I got all the water up and fans drying things out on the carpets, did not fair as well on about a 12ft x4ft run of wooden flooring. Now I am dealing with the cupping.

Anyway I can speed up drying and cupping to go back down, or am I looking at needing to refinish?
I'm not a pro, but I don't think that cupping will reverse with drying, it's like a permanent defect.

Now that I'm thinking about it, it's kind of a sham that wood isn't completely sealed to prevent this from happening... I can't think of a reason why major mfg's don't do this except that it keeps their business going.
Cupping or swelling will reverse with drying. If you think about your floor as a bunch of single boards with the tops being sealed and the edges natural. The water can more easily enter the edges which then swell. Causing the cupped look. To combat this most people/companies will sand and refinish the floor, and it will look good again…. Until the moisture level normalizes throughout the plank. Then you get crowning, which is just inverse cupping. The proper way to handle a hardwood floor is to have specialized mats that are made for drying out hardwood. Or you can rent / buy a good dehumidifier and tent off the area of the floor that is damaged woth the dehumidifier inside the tent. And then you need to be checking moisture levels on the floor. A pinless meter works well for this application, and can be bought at Lowe's for under $50. Check an area that was far away from damaged spot but still on same subfloor to figure out your goal for the damaged area. Once you are down to that number across the damaged area, pull the tent and check out the floor. If it looks good that's great, it still may need to be refinished, but will not crown after it is done.
 

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I think I have my definition if cupping wrong so I wont further commment but I have a couple ideas on moisute management.

Lets say you had a diastrous event with water, you could drill a hole in the subfloor from the basement and break the layment and let it drain.

Another potential trick is to use moisture absorbing products. Things like rice corn meal etc. im sure there are commercial products designed for this specifically.
After this period this things can easily be vacummed up.

This works wonders for spilt oil.

Another trick is to place dry things into the area and seal it off.
Just like osmosis in water, the same thing happens in air. The water wants to come into equilibrium with its surrondings.
Something as simple as placing dry towels on the wet spots and sealing it off. Its the same principle in a way as throwing dry towels in the dryer with a wet load. The towel absorbed the moisture and helps the clothes dry faster and more evenly,

Lastly, the most out there theory that would need testing is to UV light that mimicks the sun.
In the oceans and sea's, lots of h2o gets turned into water vapor without reaching its boiliing point. The right light could help facilitate this evaportion process. This will be hard to find out which light range to use if an according one is made but wanted to point this out cause its a bit fascinating.

And i guess lastly, air flow, fans. You could seal off and use a shop vac for much flow.
 

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Thick n Dense said:
I think I have my definition if cupping wrong so I wont further commment but I have a couple ideas on moisute management.

Lets say you had a diastrous event with water, you could drill a hole in the subfloor from the basement and break the layment and let it drain.

Another potential trick is to use moisture absorbing products. Things like rice corn meal etc. im sure there are commercial products designed for this specifically.
After this period this things can easily be vacummed up.

This works wonders for spilt oil.

Another trick is to place dry things into the area and seal it off.
Just like osmosis in water, the same thing happens in air. The water wants to come into equilibrium with its surrondings.
Something as simple as placing dry towels on the wet spots and sealing it off. Its the same principle in a way as throwing dry towels in the dryer with a wet load. The towel absorbed the moisture and helps the clothes dry faster and more evenly,

Lastly, the most out there theory that would need testing is to UV light that mimicks the sun.
In the oceans and sea's, lots of h2o gets turned into water vapor without reaching its boiliing point. The right light could help facilitate this evaportion process. This will be hard to find out which light range to use if an according one is made but wanted to point this out cause its a bit fascinating.

And i guess lastly, air flow, fans. You could seal off and use a shop vac for much flow.
Don't do any of that. I have been doing water damages since I was 15 years old. I have been to dozens of schools for everything involved in the process. Fire, water, mold, structural, advanced structural….. air movement with dehumidifiers. No tricks, no short cuts.
 

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Deke said:
Thick n Dense said:
I think I have my definition if cupping wrong so I wont further commment but I have a couple ideas on moisute management.

Lets say you had a diastrous event with water, you could drill a hole in the subfloor from the basement and break the layment and let it drain.

Another potential trick is to use moisture absorbing products. Things like rice corn meal etc. im sure there are commercial products designed for this specifically.
After this period this things can easily be vacummed up.

This works wonders for spilt oil.

Another trick is to place dry things into the area and seal it off.
Just like osmosis in water, the same thing happens in air. The water wants to come into equilibrium with its surrondings.
Something as simple as placing dry towels on the wet spots and sealing it off. Its the same principle in a way as throwing dry towels in the dryer with a wet load. The towel absorbed the moisture and helps the clothes dry faster and more evenly,

Lastly, the most out there theory that would need testing is to UV light that mimicks the sun.
In the oceans and sea's, lots of h2o gets turned into water vapor without reaching its boiliing point. The right light could help facilitate this evaportion process. This will be hard to find out which light range to use if an according one is made but wanted to point this out cause its a bit fascinating.

And i guess lastly, air flow, fans. You could seal off and use a shop vac for much flow.
Don't do any of that. I have been doing water damages since I was 15 years old. I have been to dozens of schools for everything involved in the process. Fire, water, mold, structural, advanced structural….. air movement with dehumidifiers. No tricks, no short cuts.
I wouldnt argue against the tried in true methods. I was think of more of a spot problem then a washer leaking all over the floor.

The concepts with a fan and dehumidifier are the same as I listed.
Dehumidifiers dry the air by removing water vapor so that the water from the wood is more likely to fill that space in the air. Just like a cup of h20 will evaportate faster on a dry day. Than a wet one.

Fans work like a stirrer in a glass beaker to speed up the reaction. Picking up that water vapor and moving to a differenr area so that dryer air can come in and absorb more h2o.

This is why the rice cell phone trick works to remove water.

Im not a pro, just wanted youll to think about water transfer in a different way.
 

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Thick n Dense said:
Deke said:
Thick n Dense said:
I think I have my definition if cupping wrong so I wont further commment but I have a couple ideas on moisute management.

Lets say you had a diastrous event with water, you could drill a hole in the subfloor from the basement and break the layment and let it drain.

Another potential trick is to use moisture absorbing products. Things like rice corn meal etc. im sure there are commercial products designed for this specifically.
After this period this things can easily be vacummed up.

This works wonders for spilt oil.

Another trick is to place dry things into the area and seal it off.
Just like osmosis in water, the same thing happens in air. The water wants to come into equilibrium with its surrondings.
Something as simple as placing dry towels on the wet spots and sealing it off. Its the same principle in a way as throwing dry towels in the dryer with a wet load. The towel absorbed the moisture and helps the clothes dry faster and more evenly,

Lastly, the most out there theory that would need testing is to UV light that mimicks the sun.
In the oceans and sea's, lots of h2o gets turned into water vapor without reaching its boiliing point. The right light could help facilitate this evaportion process. This will be hard to find out which light range to use if an according one is made but wanted to point this out cause its a bit fascinating.

And i guess lastly, air flow, fans. You could seal off and use a shop vac for much flow.
Don't do any of that. I have been doing water damages since I was 15 years old. I have been to dozens of schools for everything involved in the process. Fire, water, mold, structural, advanced structural….. air movement with dehumidifiers. No tricks, no short cuts.
I wouldnt argue against the tried in true methods. I was think of more of a spot problem then a washer leaking all over the floor.

The concepts with a fan and dehumidifier are the same as I listed.
Dehumidifiers dry the air by removing water vapor so that the water from the wood is more likely to fill that space in the air. Just like a cup of h20 will evaportate faster on a dry day. Than a wet one.

Fans work like a stirrer in a glass beaker to speed up the reaction. Picking up that water vapor and moving to a differenr area so that dryer air can come in and absorb more h2o.

This is why the rice cell phone trick works to remove water.

Im not a pro, just wanted youll to think about water transfer in a different way.
If you don't mind me asking, what do you do for a living? You can be as generalized as you want, I'm not looking for anything too specific.
 

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jayhawk said:
@corneliani I appreciate the 3/4 foam and 3/4 board on top the slab. You recall the foam brand/type? Did you see what Risinger did ?

Got a 9' basement in progress - LVP alone ...has to be awfully hard, cold and suboptimal for sound resonance.
Awesome video! Just watched it. I've never seen so many concrete guys on one project before!!! Not to mention his construction details... Risinger is crazy. 😝

I had a similar thought when I did my house, but only because I wanted to embed pex water lines throughout the slab (for a radiant heated floor). It would've required an insulation barrier under the slab so that the heat doesn't travel down & into the soil. Leave it to Risinger to pull this off the way only he can!

I ended up building the radiant subfloor on the master bathroom only & used regular XPS sheathing panels (Owens-Corning?) throughout the main level, mainly to act as a thermal bridge between the finished floor & the slab. I took care with sealing off the perimeter but his termite detail work make me think I didn't do enough. 😬. There's no way to know if they find a way in there!! Argh.

What your plan for that space you're working in?
 

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@corneliani I think your talking about his latest ....massive amount of concrete and the overthetop terminate strategy. Sorry, I was thinking about his personal house (5mo ago?) Where he laid foam and then 2 layers of 3/4 advantech.

I am close to done finishing drywall stage, a basement area (basically the kitchen and great room space) using theater techniques. Audiophile equipment and keep noise above, out. Floor is next, I refuse to use shoe mold.

My plan is some LVP .... conditioned via mini split
I did one separate room with tile ...see how long that lasts before one breaks (I didn't know to have them decouple with that orange mat....schluter?)

If there was no budget ....dricore underlayment. Balancing ideal vs practical, not 'final' home ... However I need to price a foam and board material for the sq ft. How do you get airflow in the event of water is an open question/concern
 

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jayhawk said:
@corneliani I think your talking about his latest ....massive amount of concrete and the overthetop terminate strategy. Sorry, I was thinking about his personal house (5mo ago?) Where he laid foam and then 2 layers of 3/4 advantech.

I am close to done finishing drywall stage, a basement area (basically the kitchen and great room space) using theater techniques. Audiophile equipment and keep noise above, out. Floor is next, I refuse to use shoe mold.

My plan is some LVP .... conditioned via mini split
I did one separate room with tile ...see how long that lasts before one breaks (I didn't know to have them decouple with that orange mat....schluter?)

If there was no budget ....dricore underlayment. Balancing ideal vs practical, not 'final' home ... However I need to price a foam and board material for the sq ft. How do you get airflow in the event of water is an open question/concern
You pull one side of the rooms trim, get a wedge under that side of the floor and force air in through 1/4 inch hoses. Either directly from the exhaust of a dehumidifier, or from an injecti-dry. It is actually quite easy once you have done it a time or two.
 

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How am I missing all these cool video??!! Just checked that one out & I may need to reach out & let him know I beat him to this concept 😝.

I didn't think about the benefit of a slight give that the foam gives but he has a good point there.

Btw yiur shoe mold comment had me rolling!! I don't understand using quarter-round in those instances.. that's almost 1" wide!
 

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Just a quick follow-up… we're still really happy with our decision to go with wood look tile. It suits our young family and rural location well. The Roomba is great too. :thumbup:

 

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If you are looking for a quality flooring option for your home, then consider adding wood flooring to your living space. With a variety of colors and styles, spc flooring offers an attractive and timeless alternative to more common options.
A new type of flooring that is made from recycled materials and rubber from old car tires. It is available in a variety of colors and patterns that can be made to look like wood, tile, stone, or even a grass mat.
 

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A couple of years ago, my wife and I moved into a new house and were very happy about it. We began to make repairs slowly and reached the floors. We thought for a long time and argued about which coating was better to choose. But in the end, we settled on wood and a wooden floor. I decided to lay the foundation myself; I read a lot on the Internet about how to do it correctly. I was lucky and found the site 20 Cheap DIY Flooring Ideas You Need To Know About. With the help of this site, I managed to do everything right and neatly. A wooden floor looks just gorgeous in the interior.
 

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Cupping or swelling will reverse with drying. If you think about your floor as a bunch of single boards with the tops being sealed and the edges natural. The water can more easily enter the edges which then swell. Causing the cupped look. To combat this most people/companies will sand and refinish the floor, and it will look good again…. Until the moisture level normalizes throughout the plank. Then you get crowning, which is just inverse cupping. The proper way to handle a hardwood floor is to have specialized mats that are made for drying out hardwood. Or you can rent / buy a good dehumidifier and tent off the area of the floor that is damaged woth the dehumidifier inside the tent. And then you need to be checking moisture levels on the floor. A pinless meter works well for this application, and can be bought at Lowe's for under $50. Check an area that was far away from damaged spot but still on same subfloor to figure out your goal for the damaged area. Once you are down to that number across the damaged area, pull the tent and check out luxury vinyl plank flooring atlanta. If it looks good that's great, it still may need to be refinished, but will not crown after it is done.
Hey, Finished my floating subfloor and added some kill mildew/mold primer on top. Great stuff around the edges. I’m curious if there’s any benefit to putting vinyl plank flooring down before adding furniture and counters in a build rather than adding to the visible floor areas afterward. Thanks!
 
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