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We're doing our basement shortly and are solidly between laminate and vinyl wood-look flooring. I think we're leaning towards vinyl for the water resistance with young kids spilling stuff everywhere.

Odd everyone here is talking about installing right on the slab. Here it's pretty typical to do a subfloor for both warmth and allow water to run underneath (worst case...definitely not normal). Either plastic roll stuff then plywood or the all-in-one 24"x24" tiles like these https://dricore.com/products/dricore-subfloor. We're leaning towards the ones that instead of plastic use rigid foam and provide a small R3 insulation. From what I've heard it makes a difference in floor temperature.
 

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Ware said:
I think one method is installing a 3/4" treated plywood underlayment on top of a plastic barrier. With today's lumber prices, that is a lot of unnecessary expense - not to mention some of the issues you would run into having an inch and half of flooring on top of the slab (e.g. trimming doors).
Commodity builders still put in trim before a non carpeted floor? I'm sure 'i just don't understand'
 

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Above grade, new home....solid, site finish. Retro u have other concerns. All the engineered wood I have walked on felt cheap, like a cork feel? Maybe I've never seen 'good stuff'.
Tile on concrete, better have a decoupling strategy.

SodFace said:
We're doing our basement shortly and are solidly between laminate and vinyl wood-look flooring. I think we're leaning towards vinyl for the water resistance with young kids spilling stuff everywhere.

Odd everyone here is talking about installing right on the slab. Here it's pretty typical to do a subfloor for both warmth and allow water to run underneath (worst case...definitely not normal). Either plastic roll stuff then plywood or the all-in-one 24"x24" tiles like these https://dricore.com/products/dricore-subfloor. We're leaning towards the ones that instead of plastic use rigid foam and provide a small R3 insulation. From what I've heard it makes a difference in floor temperature.
Ditto. I need to price it out (dricore). While I have no interest in engineered wood but LVP I think wins due to moisture advantages. I would like some 'cushion', air and insulation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
jayhawk said:
Ware said:
I think one method is installing a 3/4" treated plywood underlayment on top of a plastic barrier. With today's lumber prices, that is a lot of unnecessary expense - not to mention some of the issues you would run into having an inch and half of flooring on top of the slab (e.g. trimming doors).
Commodity builders still put in trim before a non carpeted floor? I'm sure 'i just don't understand'
In new construction around here I would say interior trim is almost always installed, caulked/puttied, primed, sanded and shot with lacquer before any flooring goes down. I personally wouldn't want that work performed over a finished floor, but YMMV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Just an update - we ended up going with a wood look tile for overall durability. It hasn't been cleaned in this photo, but you can get an idea of what it looks like:

 

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Ware said:
jayhawk said:
Ware said:
I think one method is installing a 3/4" treated plywood underlayment on top of a plastic barrier. With today's lumber prices, that is a lot of unnecessary expense - not to mention some of the issues you would run into having an inch and half of flooring on top of the slab (e.g. trimming doors).
Commodity builders still put in trim before a non carpeted floor? I'm sure 'i just don't understand'
In new construction around here I would say interior trim is almost always installed, caulked/puttied, primed, sanded and shot with lacquer before any flooring goes down. I personally wouldn't want that work performed over a finished floor, but YMMV.
I just prefer base ontop floors and no shoe mould. Ramboard ;)
 

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SodFace said:
We're doing our basement shortly and are solidly between laminate and vinyl wood-look flooring. I think we're leaning towards vinyl for the water resistance with young kids spilling stuff everywhere.

Odd everyone here is talking about installing right on the slab. Here it's pretty typical to do a subfloor for both warmth and allow water to run underneath (worst case...definitely not normal). Either plastic roll stuff then plywood or the all-in-one 24"x24" tiles like these https://dricore.com/products/dricore-subfloor. We're leaning towards the ones that instead of plastic use rigid foam and provide a small R3 insulation. From what I've heard it makes a difference in floor temperature.
You don't need water management if your slab is on/above grade, it's usually for below grade applications where you have to mitigate for the capillary action through concrete walls/slab. That's when it becomes best practice to create an air barrier, be it with sleepers or the $$$ dricore product. And for a below-grade application the floating vinyl products are really a good idea, esp if you get the nicer CVT-type ones. They're resilient and easy to disassemble if needed.... and the heavier material products don't sound/feel hollow & mushy.

@jayhawk - are we the only ones in the country that still prefer natural hardwood flooring as a premium product?? lol It is a lot more work, that's for sure, but it's a classic look for sure. At least for us it is.
 

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Ware said:
Just an update - we ended up going with a wood look tile for overall durability. It hasn't been cleaned in this photo, but you can get an idea of what it looks like:
That looks good Ware! I particularly like the split-width on some of the tiles, it gives it a nice randomness.

Landscaping next??
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
corneliani said:
Ware said:
Just an update - we ended up going with a wood look tile for overall durability. It hasn't been cleaned in this photo, but you can get an idea of what it looks like:
That looks good Ware! I particularly like the split-width on some of the tiles, it gives it a nice randomness.

Landscaping next??
Thanks, and I agree - I like that it doesn't look as repetitive as some of the WLT's I've seen.

We're not quite to landscaping yet, but should be setting up for a driveway and sidewalks soon. We're in the queue, but spring rain every few days has the dozer guy backed up.
 

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jayhawk said:
Ditto. I need to price it out (dricore). While I have no interest in engineered wood but LVP I think wins due to moisture advantages. I would like some 'cushion', air and insulation.
We ended up going with that insulated dricore subfloor and a middleish grade vinyl flooring. Probably won't really be able to tell how well it works until this winter.
 

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Ware said:
We're not quite to landscaping yet, but should be setting up for a driveway and sidewalks soon. We're in the queue, but spring rain every few days has the dozer guy backed up.
But of course... setting you up to do landscaping right as the hottest time of the year rolls around! Classic.

@SodFace - I was looking for these pics of one of our church youth leaders, it's a plastic composite (SPC) but I was pleasantly surprised by how classy it turned out. Funny part is, it was lai8 over the existing glue-down engineered floor since it's only about 1/8" thick! Aint nobody got time for scraping off glue-down. :p
If you don't have existing moisture issues I wonder if this isn't good enough to lay down directly on the slab (?).





 

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corneliani said:
@SodFace - I was looking for these pics of one of our church youth leaders, it's a plastic composite (SPC) but I was pleasantly surprised by how classy it turned out. Funny part is, it was lai8 over the existing glue-down engineered floor since it's only about 1/8" thick! Aint nobody got time for scraping off glue-down. :p
If you don't have existing moisture issues I wonder if this isn't good enough to lay down directly on the slab (?).
That looks pretty good.

The builder would have put the underpadding and carpet right on the slab.

I decided dricore to make the floor a lot warmer and hedge against moisture issues. We actually had all insulation ripped out, mold removed, and spray foamed prior to this basement project starting. So I guess you can say we HAD moisture issues but that's dealt with now.
 

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Being in the mitten, I visited this factory before purchasing. Their unique thing is a 3" - 4" - 5"
Pattern.
The stuffs gorgeous ans adds a unique flair that breaks the mold a bit. Great selection of different styles and wood.
Expensive of course.
I went with the paradise hickory as was closest of matched to my cabinets https://www.chelseaplank.com/chateau-series

My only complaint is that my contractor basically skipped out on the floor leveling part (no correalation to the wood mfg)
This is real and impacts over all look when done. Dont skip this step.

Fortunately, no one notices but me.

Also, if you have an older house replacing or placing new subfloor for increased strentgh is a good habbit as well.

I ultimately chose real wood so that I can refinish when the kids are gone. I know that ittl get beat the F up over the years. Idk the exact number but you get a handfull of sandings with real wood. I guess enter the disposaple razor blade anology here. The cost of install these days is almost as much as the wood.

Also real wood is more resilient to water than engineered and laminate unless otherwise stated.

I thing i have a pic of it before funiture was moved in...

Also shop around when bidding, in my area, these guys are so busy that theyre booked for months and what they do is give you a quote for a ridiculous amount know that they dont need the work but if you agree theyll cancel their other job and make 2-4k more on you.
 

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We just finished turning the previous owner's office into our nursery and floated engineered hardwood over the old wooden floor (was covered by dirty old carpet when we bought the house). We were hopeful to be able to refinish the existing flooring as the room across the hall has nice natural wood, but holes from the pipes of the old radiant heating system and a big patched spot (we're thinking they moved the cold air return at some point?) made just laying new floor the better option. Overall we're really happy with how it turned out and how easily it was to put down. Now we're just hoping that durability is as good as promised.
 

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Deke said:
My 2cents. Coming from a carpet cleaning / restoration background. I would guess I have seen, touched, installed, and removed more flooring than 99.9% of people on the planet.

1. Real wood flooring. Preferably a hardwood. Tough to beat real hardwood. Only downfalls are cost and it's a pain to dry if it gets wet. If it does it usually takes specialized equipment to get it dry, most likely will have cupping for up to 6 months while floor re normalizes it's moisture content. And then will most likely need to be refinished.
@Deke Do you have any tips on getting wet hardwood dried out on a slab. About 3 weeks ago we had an overflow, and while I thought I got all the water up and fans drying things out on the carpets, did not fair as well on about a 12ft x4ft run of wooden flooring. Now I am dealing with the cupping.

Anyway I can speed up drying and cupping to go back down, or am I looking at needing to refinish?
 

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Bmossin said:
Deke said:
My 2cents. Coming from a carpet cleaning / restoration background. I would guess I have seen, touched, installed, and removed more flooring than 99.9% of people on the planet.

1. Real wood flooring. Preferably a hardwood. Tough to beat real hardwood. Only downfalls are cost and it's a pain to dry if it gets wet. If it does it usually takes specialized equipment to get it dry, most likely will have cupping for up to 6 months while floor re normalizes it's moisture content. And then will most likely need to be refinished.
@Deke Do you have any tips on getting wet hardwood dried out on a slab. About 3 weeks ago we had an overflow, and while I thought I got all the water up and fans drying things out on the carpets, did not fair as well on about a 12ft x4ft run of wooden flooring. Now I am dealing with the cupping.

Anyway I can speed up drying and cupping to go back down, or am I looking at needing to refinish?
I'm not a pro, but I don't think that cupping will reverse with drying, it's like a permanent defect.

Now that I'm thinking about it, it's kind of a sham that wood isn't completely sealed to prevent this from happening... I can't think of a reason why major mfg's don't do this except that it keeps their business going.
 
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