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I have been dealing with those things for 5 years now . They cause tremendous damage to trees if left uncontrolled. Sevin hose end sprayer works great, it kills the ones it hits and then kills the ones that come later and try to eat the leaves. Some trees they will eat and some they will not, crabapple and ornamental cherry trees are some other ones they will destroy.
 

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I noticed a bunch of Japanese Beetles congregating on my baby apple tree which is still in a container, and they would have killed the thing if I hadn't noticed in time. While I have knocked them off physically and with some neem oil, I have seen more of these flying around the yard.

I have read that these beetles are only active for about a month of the year, and you can prevent some by treating your lawn for grubs. However, will that even make a difference considering that I live in a standard subdivision with yards so close together? Is it better to just treat them when I see them rather than try to prevent them since they'll be around anyway?

 

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Phids said:
I noticed a bunch of Japanese Beetles congregating on my baby apple tree which is still in a container, and they would have killed the thing if I hadn't noticed in time. While I have knocked them off physically and with some neem oil, I have seen more of these flying around the yard.

I have read that these beetles are only active for about a month of the year, and you can prevent some by treating your lawn for grubs. However, will that even make a difference considering that I live in a standard subdivision with yards so close together? Is it better to just treat them when I see them rather than try to prevent them since they'll be around anyway?

In my experience with them when you treat for grubs you save your lawn and reduce overall population. But yea you'll probably still need to treat your plants that they go after. Kill them all...they're invasive.
 

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SodFace said:
In my experience with them when you treat for grubs you save your lawn and reduce overall population. But yea you'll probably still need to treat your plants that they go after. Kill them all...they're invasive.
Thanks. I may treat for grubs to try to reduce them, but the problem is that my yard is in the middle of a block with a lot of other yards, and unless everyone kills them, my efforts might not amount to much.

I did try some neem oil spray on my apple tree, but from what I understand that only stops the beetle's ability to reproduce in the future. I also tried some bacillus thuringiensis spray, but that didn't seem to keep them off the leaves.

In the end, I set up a few Japanese Beetle traps that I got at Walmart. After setting out my first trap I noticed I caught over 100 beetles in it in a matter of days.
 

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Budstl said:
I have beetles eating my japanese maple. What can i use to kill/control them?
This year? Not much. Water spray or maybe a BB gun. FWIW, YMMV but, We found traps useless for anything other than attracting the beetles over into our yard from neighboring properties.

Next year and into the future? Planning and prep for dramatic success!

Our yard was literally inundated and overrun and our THREE-pronged program / plan-of-action has resulted in pretty much 98+% removal and what few fly over from other properties succumb immediately to # 3

(Note: I have an annual JAN / FEB reminder in my phone so I order # 3 and start looking for # 2 on store shelves to avoid any low inventory issues and to ensure I have the products actually on-hand when I need them and can cherry pick good weather / pre-rain days to apply them.)

1. We applied milky disease spore back in 2015 - just once - and which I remain speechless and flabbergasted to still see statements such as "no scientific proof" it works etc as I have yet to see it not work even in instances where friends family and neighbors did nothing but apply milky disease spore (I.e., they opt to not use grub preventative / curative chemicals OR tree / shrub drench)!

Link: https://duckduckgo.com/?q=how+to+apply+milky+spore+powder&t=h_&ia=web

2. Each April/May we apply a grub preventative annually (actually this is more to prevent any more extensive and "roto-tiller-type" damage by turkeys skunks and other residents which preceded us, flipping the turf over because they smell any hint of any type of larvae under our grass)

Link: https://www.canr.msu.edu/news/how_to_choose_and_when_to_apply_grub_control_products_for_your_lawn

3. Each March/April we apply *LIQUID* Imidacloprid as a root drench at the base of any trees or shrubs which ever attracted Jap Beetles. Simply mix the correct # of ounces of product into one or two gallons of water and slowly pour around the base or trunk - the plant takes the active ingredient up into its system and Jap Beetles are literally DOA / DRT as soon as they pierce / bite into the plant! :thumbup:

Links:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Compare-N-Save-2-5-Gal-Systemic-Tree-and-Shrub-Insect-Drench-75334/205213426

https://www.domyown.com/fertilome-tree-and-shrub-systemic-insect-drench-p-1523.html?msclkid=5275e66198011191d1a684c51372ef30&utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=%28ROI%29+Shopping+-+Lawn+and+Garden&utm_term=4581115204333651&utm_content=Lawn+%26+Garden+-+Best+Sellers&sub_id=1973
 

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Phids said:
SodFace said:
In my experience with them when you treat for grubs you save your lawn and reduce overall population. But yea you'll probably still need to treat your plants that they go after. Kill them all...they're invasive.
Thanks. I may treat for grubs to try to reduce them, but the problem is that my yard is in the middle of a block with a lot of other yards, and unless everyone kills them, my efforts might not amount to much.

I did try some neem oil spray on my apple tree, but from what I understand that only stops the beetle's ability to reproduce in the future. I also tried some bacillus thuringiensis spray, but that didn't seem to keep them off the leaves.

In the end, I set up a few Japanese Beetle traps that I got at Walmart. After setting out my first trap I noticed I caught over 100 beetles in it in a matter of days.
I use Bifenthrin - already have it for mosquitos and such. Looks like you're in the US so your hardware store probably has some stuff that'll kill them. Online you can get "professional" grade stuff which is higher concentration. I get Bifen I/T and it mixes 0.6-1oz of chemical to 1 gallon water. Read label/watch some YouTube or whatever but avoid food plants(duh) and flowers(don't kill the bees).

https://www.domyown.com/bifen-it-p-226.html

Edit/ Same as the above poster I use Imidachloprid for preventative grub control.

Edit2/ This thread is awesome for grub control https://thelawnforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=31&t=179

Specifically this article is fantastic: https://www.canr.msu.edu/news/how_to_choose_and_when_to_apply_grub_control_products_for_your_lawn
 

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@Budstl I can attest to what 440mag said above. While I only did #3 as the Jap beetles just sprung out and surprised us real quick - it works.

We had a Japanese beetle problem too but our community was slow to react purely because of being unaware of it - the beetles came in along with a new tree one of our neighbors brought and devastated the whole lanes' flower beds. Sadly I was traveling at that time so I came back to no flowers and almost heavily stressed out rose plants. When I left they were pretty awesome looking, over 50 flowers in all shades of pink and red.

Pre-emergent control
What 440mag said.
If you're not comfortable doing that, put down some Grub-Ex (Season Long). Further since you already had a break-out the beetles shouldve already laid eggs, when the eggs hatch, they will start eating the grass roots - which will show up as brown patches of dead grass in your lawn - as soon as you see that, put down some 24hr Grub killer (check out BioAdvanced product in Lowes/Homedepot).

Post active feeding - immediate help
To dissuade active feeding, I found that a mixture of neem and a very small amount of dish detergent and out right spraying on the leaves/flowers goes a long way. Neem is bitter and emits a pheromone that makes animals not want to go near it and the dish detergent is just like a wash.

Traps:
Unless you're dealing will hundreds of active feeders on your plants I would suggest against the traps. I can rephrase that as "traps are for very short term control to kill about 70% of active beetles". Dead beetles emit a pheromone that other live beetles identify as danger so they avoid it after a point - unless you do due diligence in cleaning/washing it every day. The traps at first end up attracting beetles from neighboring lawns too.
 

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Phids said:
… the problem is that my yard is in the middle of a block with a lot of other yards, and unless everyone kills them, my efforts might not amount to much. …
Circling back to this thread as ^that^ precise dilemma came to mind as I just finished sweeping DEAD Jap Beetles off the front walk - which had flown over from neighboring tracts …

Meanwhile, our crape myrtle flowers are brimming vitality and gorgeous - and devoid of the little JB suckers/munchers coming from elsewhere; as soon as they (any insect, ftm) *bite* into the plant they fall off dead or paralyzed …

THIS. STUFF. JUST. PLAIN. WORKS!!!!
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Compare-N-Save-2-5-Gal-Systemic-Tree-and-Shrub-Insect-Drench-75334/205213426

Gotta get it poured around base of each shrub / tree in March , April at latest (in my locale) but, it works all season long! :thumbup:

.

 

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My two year old Natchez crepe is under attack by Japanese beetles. I have been drowning them 2-3 times daily and their numbers were growing. Last evening I sprayed the crepe with neem oil and seem to have less today. I have lived in this home for 31+ years and have never had this problem. My concern is JB grubs might attack my lawn. Have never had a grub problem. No preventive has ever been applied to lawn. Should I go ahead and put a grub preventive down now or wait and see if there is a grub problem this fall? Thanks for your help.
 

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absabalu said:
My two year old Natchez crepe is under attack by Japanese beetles. I have been drowning them 2-3 times daily and their numbers were growing. Last evening I sprayed the crepe with neem oil and seem to have less today. I have lived in this home for 31+ years and have never had this problem. My concern is JB grubs might attack my lawn. Have never had a grub problem. No preventive has ever been applied to lawn. Should I go ahead and put a grub preventive down now or wait and see if there is a grub problem this fall? Thanks for your help.
I am south of Atlanta as well and so I am glad to hear you say that this year is unusually heavy in Japanese Beetle activity. I never noticed them in the past so perhaps 2022 is just an outlier year.

I have noticed that the activity does seem to have begun to taper off, so hopefully we're near the end of the 40-day lifecycle of these bugs. It looks like grub control needs to be done to the lawn sometime in July-August, so I will be putting something down at that time.
 

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absabalu said:
…Should I …wait and see …?
Phids said:
… I never noticed them in the past so perhaps 2022 is just an outlier year. …
I am no entomologist but, in all I've learned about them, Japanese Beetles aren't "like locusts" … I would be thrilled to be wrong but, my prediction is now you got 'em, you're gonna have 'em from now on … and once we got 'em I am sure I can't think of anytime where "they're not as bad as last year or two years ago" ever got us anywhere even approaching a number that was acceptable to our landscape plants …

One need only do #1 below once every decade (no brainer imo); #2 and #3 takes care of and protects turf and plantings from a host of other damaging pests ON TOP of Jap Beetles so, my budget and energy levels would have to take some really serious hits for me to not use the below plan of action, now that I know about it, as long as we live anywhere Jap Beetles exist …

440mag said:
… our THREE-pronged program / plan-of-action has resulted in pretty much 98+% removal and what few fly over from other properties succumb immediately to # 3

(Note: I have an annual JAN / FEB reminder in my phone so I order # 3 and start looking for # 2 on store shelves to avoid any low inventory issues and to ensure I have the products actually on-hand when I need them and can cherry pick good weather / pre-rain days to apply them.)

1. We applied milky disease spore back in 2015 - just once - and which I remain speechless and flabbergasted to still see statements such as "no scientific proof" it works etc as I have yet to see it not work even in instances where friends family and neighbors did nothing but apply milky disease spore (I.e., they opt to not use grub preventative / curative chemicals OR tree / shrub drench)!

Link: https://duckduckgo.com/?q=how+to+apply+milky+spore+powder&t=h_&ia=web

2. Each April/May we apply a grub preventative annually (actually this is more to prevent any more extensive and "roto-tiller-type" damage by turkeys skunks and other residents which preceded us, flipping the turf over because they smell any hint of any type of larvae under our grass)

Link: https://www.canr.msu.edu/news/how_to_choose_and_when_to_apply_grub_control_products_for_your_lawn

3. Each March/April we apply *LIQUID* Imidacloprid as a root drench at the base of any trees or shrubs which ever attracted Jap Beetles. Simply mix the correct # of ounces of product into one or two gallons of water and slowly pour around the base or trunk - the plant takes the active ingredient up into its system and Jap Beetles are literally DOA / DRT as soon as they pierce / bite into the plant! :thumbup:

Links:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Compare-N-Save-2-5-Gal-Systemic-Tree-and-Shrub-Insect-Drench-75334/205213426

https://www.domyown.com/fertilome-tree-and-shrub-systemic-insect-drench-p-1523.html?msclkid=5275e66198011191d1a684c51372ef30&utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=%28ROI%29+Shopping+-+Lawn+and+Garden&utm_term=4581115204333651&utm_content=Lawn+%26+Garden+-+Best+Sellers&sub_id=1973
 

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Thanks for the replies to my query. Sorry to hear you have them also, Phids. Looks like the lawn will be getting a grub preventive each spring now! I read about milky spore a few days ago. And think this is the way to go. Am I correct that this fall I should not apply any preventive/ corrective measures if grub activity is present so the milky spore bacteria can "feast" on any JB grubs and multiply? And do you believe the root drench would be beneficial now that the invasion is waning?

Thanks
 

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absabalu said:
… I read about milky spore a few days ago. And think this is the way to go. Am I correct that this fall I should not apply any preventive/ corrective measures if grub activity is present so the milky spore bacteria can "feast" on any JB grubs and multiply? …
Now ^that^ is a most excellent question! And, "I DO NOT KNOW" for sure but, it seems intuitive to me that based on the way Milky Disease spore spreads the more hosts the better!

I do know that applying Milky Spore was THE FIRST THING we did (in August) as by the time the good folks at SiteOne told us about root drenching with imidicloprid it was July and pretty much too late - and the results (JB reduced numbers) the next year from just the milky disease spore were dramatic!!!!!

The next year after that and we barely saw any JB's, anywhere, at all!!!!!

But then, two things happened that caused me to:
1) use both 24-hour grub killer (curative) AND chlorantraniloprole (preventative); AND,
2) begun root drenching

The first were turkeys which were after other-than-JB grubs that the milky disease obviously didn't effect; AND then secondly, they started building houses around us - with lawns and owners who weren't worried about JB's and so the JB's fly over to our landscape from those neighbors lawns.

But as mentioned previously, the root drench zaps them immediately …

absabalu said:
… And do you believe the root drench would be beneficial now that the invasion is waning?

Yes. Unless you have other insects to worry about (I.e., bagworms on Leyland Cypress +/or arborvitae, etc,) I'd hold off on the root drench until next (EARLY!) spring

Thanks
 
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