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Bermudagrass, 3.75 acres, Arkansas
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As we approach spring pre-emergent applications...

Water dispersible granules or liquid Prodiamine are the most cost effective pre-emergent solutions, but there are some other options out there for a person with a small-medium size lawn that isn't quite ready to "calibrate a sprayer". My local supply house carries a granular BCF 0-0-7 w/0.43% Prodiamine. The label max application rate per calendar year for this particular product on bermuda is 8lbs product per thousand square feet. It costs about $23 after tax for a 50lb bag, so annual pre-emergent cost would be $3.68 per thousand.

For comparison, this 5lb jug of Prodiamine 65 WDG costs about $0.79/oz. The annual max application rate for bermuda is 0.83 oz of product per thousand so annual pre-emergent cost would be about $0.66 per thousand.

So again, spraying pre-emergent is significantly cheaper, but $3.68 per thousand is probably not cost prohibitive for an average size lawn. I've also found that it's sometimes easier to get my neighbors and friends excited about committing to a pre-emergent regimen if they can apply it with a broadcast spreader - versus calibrating/mixing/spraying precision liquids.
 

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I'm planning on a two part Prodiamine application. I did my first application in September and was planning on my second application in late February or early March. I've read that the best time to do it is when the average soil temperature reaches 55 degrees or when the forsythias start to bloom. This year, due to unusually warm temps (in North Texas), the soil temps are already up to 55. Should I apply now? Or wait another two weeks?
 

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Bermudagrass, 3.75 acres, Arkansas
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douglasbb said:
I'm planning on a two part Prodiamine application. I did my first application in September and was planning on my second application in late February or early March. I've read that the best time to do it is when the average soil temperature reaches 55 degrees or when the forsythias start to bloom. This year, due to unusually warm temps (in North Texas), the soil temps are already up to 55. Should I apply now? Or wait another two weeks?
I also use a two app Prodiamine plan with great success - half in spring and half in fall. Average soil temp readings can vary a bit, and actual readings you take yourself don't always agree with soil temp maps, but you're on the right track with wanting to get the pre-e barrier established before the average soil temps reach the range where crabgrass is known to germinate. With pre-emergent, being a couple weeks early is much better than being a couple weeks late. With Prodiamine, length of control is measured in months, so I wouldn't have any problem cheating on the side of being a little too early.




(Prodiamine 65 WDG Label)

Also keep in mind that Prodiamine is most effective when it is activated with at least 1/2" of rainfall or irrigation before weeds germinate and within 14 days after application. It looks like North Texas has some rain in the forecast, so I would say go for it!



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Tifgrand—7,500 sq/ft—Baroness LM56
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If you are planning a Spring scalp/verticut on your lawn, it would be wise to wait until all that is done if you are going to be disturbing the soil in anyway.
 

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Tifgrand—7,500 sq/ft—Baroness LM56
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On another note, If you happen to have Celsius on hand, you can add that to the Prodiamine mix and kill to birds with one stone when you spray, as it will kill as existing weeds and prevent anymore from coming up. I think Celsius even has something like a 30 day residual too!!
 

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Mightyquinn said:
On another note, If you happen to have Celsius on hand, you can add that to the Prodiamine mix and kill to birds with one stone when you spray, as it will kill as existing weeds and prevent anymore from coming up. I think Celsius even has something like a 30 day residual too!!
Don't you want the Celsius to stay on the leafy plant matter (don't water it in) and the prodiamine to go into the soil (water it in)?
 

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douglasbb said:
Mightyquinn said:
On another note, If you happen to have Celsius on hand, you can add that to the Prodiamine mix and kill to birds with one stone when you spray, as it will kill as existing weeds and prevent anymore from coming up. I think Celsius even has something like a 30 day residual too!!
Don't you want the Celsius to stay on the leafy plant matter (don't water it in) and the prodiamine to go into the soil (water it in)?
Celsius' label says do not irrigate until spray has dried. Personally I would like it on the plants for more than 10 minutes but I've never used the stuff. I would spray prodiamine/Celsius mixture in the afternoon then have the sprinklers set to put out 1/2" in the early morning.
 

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Tifgrand—7,500 sq/ft—Baroness LM56
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douglasbb said:
Mightyquinn said:
On another note, If you happen to have Celsius on hand, you can add that to the Prodiamine mix and kill to birds with one stone when you spray, as it will kill as existing weeds and prevent anymore from coming up. I think Celsius even has something like a 30 day residual too!!
Don't you want the Celsius to stay on the leafy plant matter (don't water it in) and the prodiamine to go into the soil (water it in)?
Yes, you are correct but like J_nick said, once it's dry you are good to water it in. So you could spray in the evening and water it all in the next time you run your irrigation. Prodiamine recommends watering it in within 2 weeks of application, but sooner the better.
 
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