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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I suggested the diy sprinkler to my mom as she has some flower beds etc, but she does not need a pgp head.

What's good for putting around flower boxes and some shrubs? Any reason to consider a drip type solution?
 

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Mine is part of my built-in irrigation system and contains mostly Hunter and RainBird components. It uses 1.0 and 2.0 GPH self-piercing barb emitters and 1/2" tubing.

Are you just connecting it to a hose bibb? Plan on using a timer?

Whatever route you go you'll probably want to install a filter/regulator of some sort.

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ware said:
Mine is part of my built-in irrigation system and contains mostly Hunter and RainBird components. It uses 1.0 and 2.0 GPH self-piercing barb emitters and 1/2" tubing.

Are you just connecting it to a hose bibb? Plan on using a timer?

Whatever route you go you'll probably want to install a filter/regulator of some sort.

honestly, I do not know what i want specifically. I guess maybe I need some guidance here. I ventured into this by simply suggesting a modified diy pgp (modified in that it be a smaller head) solution for my mom and her garden. She has long relied on had watering and an oscillating sprinkler. I was just hoping to simplify her life.

I would be able to provide her with my old rainbird timer (as I have the rachio now), but I think that is over complicating things. I am certain she would be equally satisfied with a manual type solution where she is connected at the hose bib. Or, a hose bib timer. I doubt she is interested in a fully integrated solution.

Any thoughts are appreciated, the area she is working with is as follows:
that area being stones and only needing the 4 beds and 10-12 pots and the 10-12 shrubs

I assume pots may still fall under the manual watering, but I am all ears.
 

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There are ways to run drip tube up into potted plants.

That said, before you get too far I would make sure she is comfortable with the concept of drip irrigation. If she is accustomed to hand watering (seeing the plants get wet), she may not like drip.

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
well, I guess I should know what to tell her the concept of a drip system vs normal watering.

I found this very basic break down of the 2.

https://www.nativelanddesign.com/blog/drip-irrigation-vs.-spray-irrigation-which-is-the-right-choice-for-your-commercial-property

Is there a time one is better than the other? From the article, under spray, I consider everything she has to be "seasonal color beds", if that makes a difference of not
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ware said:
Something like Hunter Micro Sprays may be another option to look into.

yes, this was more my thought, when I started the conversation with her. I thought these were available as threaded heads that can be put on our PVC base. We have some around work, they are high sitting pop up style heads vs these even. I'll get a picture
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Colonel K0rn said:
Looks like some of the return springs are faulty, because they should retract back into the body, unless they're stubbed as risers (doubtful). Since she has the heads already there, you could set her up on a manifold that can have 4 to 8 feeder lines that go out and you can put the drip emitters on them. I used 1/4" emitter tubing for my planters, along with some 0.5 GPM emitters for the larger plants.
So those are the ones around my office.

I'll ask my mom if she wants a spray system or drip system and report.
 

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I misunderstood those to be at her house. Here's a picture you can share with her as my system is clearly visible since I aggressively cut back my hedges a few days ago. I used a 4 way splitter on my hose bib. The black adapter and hose is for the micro with small emitters (1 GPH and less) for hanging baskets and planters, the brown is for the 2 GPH for shrubs and flowerbed. I can water them separately, since I am applying fert as suggested by Connor Ward by hand can every other day, and using the hose bib for those days with clear water. Sure, I could set them on a timer, but right now, this works just fine. I'd be overwatering as cool as it is now if I did it every day. The summer is a different story.

 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Colonel K0rn said:
I misunderstood those to be at her house. Here's a picture you can share with her as my system is clearly visible since I aggressively cut back my hedges a few days ago. I used a 4 way splitter on my hose bib. The black adapter and hose is for the micro with small emitters (1 GPH and less) for hanging baskets and planters, the brown is for the 2 GPH for shrubs and flowerbed. I can water them separately, since I am applying fert as suggested by Connor Ward by hand can every other day, and using the hose bib for those days with clear water. Sure, I could set them on a timer, but right now, this works just fine. I'd be overwatering as cool as it is now if I did it every day. The summer is a different story.

This is great. So you essentially just turn it on, let it run for x time and you know how much water you put down.

Looking at just shrub with the loop around it. There are 2 emitters and these trickle the water out, soil is wet and you call it a day.

I some of these details to my mom, she said we can discuss tonight the differences between drip systems and can/spray watering.

I guess I will just tell her the following:

drip system is in place, turn on and off for your desired watering. controlled by the emitters etc. measured by GPM of the emitters and timing

spraying and watering, you see and sort of know what you are applying. has runoff where a drip system has less runoff

any reason one is truly better than the other?
 

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Drip applies the water directly to the soil and you can control the flow rate by the type of emitter you punch into the line. I'd say the advantage is that there's no evaporation, and the water is going exactly where it's needed, into the soil. It's not going onto the foliage, and I don't have to worry about it dripping onto the porch, or sidewalk (unless it runs too long). It's easy to install because I just ran the line around every shrub, staked it into place, and punched in the emitters around every shrub. The larger ones got 2, the smaller get 1. In the flowerbed, I was able to tee off of the line to make parallel lines like this, hard to draw on forum, but you'll get the idea. The e is the emitter for each shrub, and then smaller emitters in the flower bed. I give the flower bed a good long soaking 1x a week. I drew this in a hurry, don't judge. ;)

I plan on changing out the curved lines at the end with this type of dripline, because they put out less water, and the annuals don't need as much. Plus 1/4" line is easier to maneuver than 1/2 line when it comes to digging up the plants, and changing them out. 1/4 Dripline with 6 in emitter spacing

 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Colonel K0rn said:
Drip applies the water directly to the soil and you can control the flow rate by the type of emitter you punch into the line. I'd say the advantage is that there's no evaporation, and the water is going exactly where it's needed, into the soil. It's not going onto the foliage, and I don't have to worry about it dripping onto the porch, or sidewalk (unless it runs too long). It's easy to install because I just ran the line around every shrub, staked it into place, and punched in the emitters around every shrub. The larger ones got 2, the smaller get 1. In the flowerbed, I was able to tee off of the line to make parallel lines like this, hard to draw on forum, but you'll get the idea. The e is the emitter for each shrub, and then smaller emitters in the flower bed. I give the flower bed a good long soaking 1x a week. I drew this in a hurry, don't judge. ;)

I plan on changing out the curved lines at the end with this type of dripline, because they put out less water, and the annuals don't need as much. Plus 1/4" line is easier to maneuver than 1/2 line when it comes to digging up the plants, and changing them out. 1/4 Dripline with 6 in emitter spacing
Does the dripline even need emitters or do you just utilize the holes and that is all? Or, by adding emitters you know your specific flow rate so add them where you desire better control
 

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Ware said:
Mine is part of my built-in irrigation system and contains mostly Hunter and RainBird components. It uses 1.0 and 2.0 GPH self-piercing barb emitters and 1/2" tubing.

Are you just connecting it to a hose bibb? Plan on using a timer?

Whatever route you go you'll probably want to install a filter/regulator of some sort.

So did you convert pop ups to drip systems? I am going to have to use existing pop ups to convert to drip for roughly 15 beds starting with my rose beds and potted flowers.

Not sure where to install regulators and filters. Just don't know what I'm doing on that front
 

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@Ecks from Tex mine was a new install, but you should be able to install a regulator and filter on your existing zone valve(s).

https://www.hunterindustries.com/irrigation-product/micro-irrigation/drip-control-zone-kits

https://www.hunterindustries.com/sites/default/files/rc-051-br-dripcontrolzone-residential-us-web.pdf
 
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