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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Every year those of us who have KBG go through the same cycle. At least I do. Wait for the snow to melt and the KBG to wake up. It always wakes up unevenly and starts growing patchy. Cut low to remove the brown blades and warm up the soil. Mid-May, it's finally woken, filled in any small bare spots, and growing evenly. Raise HOC and it's looking sweet. Without fail, a week or two later, here come the seed heads and stalks. That'll last until Early summer when the heat and drought kicks in and the turf wants to go into some state of Summer dormancy. So, about 2 weeks of beautiful lawn until Fall. Is it just me?
 

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Bermudagrass, 3.75 acres, Arkansas
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A little different here in the south, but we have our own crosses to bear. I try to convince myself it's not the destination, but the journey that I enjoy. :mrgreen:
 

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I suppose in that respect we're lucky in the transition zone that bluegrass seems to grow through winter, so we get a October - May window of good looking grass. But during winter it gets dark at 5 and I get home from work at 5:30, so I only get to enjoy it on the weekend.
FWIW, seed heads can be successfully suppressed by 3 applications of a mix of 0.35oz trinexapac-ethyl and 0.6oz Florel(ethephon) per thousand every two weeks , beginning two weeks before seed head season.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It's pouring rain right now and it's already gone to pot, but I'll try to get a pic this week.
This is about 5-6 years ago. Cut by my tractor evidencing wide stripe pattern.

This is about 2-3 years ago. Stripping courtesy of Honda HRX

Stopped raining. Here is the current mess.
 

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Tifgrand—7,500 sq/ft—Baroness LM56
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I do it for the challenge of trying to have a great lawn and get it as close to perfection as I can. I like the fact that I can see the fruit of my labor (or the failure) and learn from it and use what I did the previous years to help me for the upcoming years. I like to be challenged as it makes you think and I also just like being in the yard. I also like to play golf which is something else that is hard to master but can be very rewarding when everything works out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
j4c11 said:
I suppose in that respect we're lucky in the transition zone that bluegrass seems to grow through winter, so we get a October - May window of good looking grass. But during winter it gets dark at 5 and I get home from work at 5:30, so I only get to enjoy it on the weekend.
FWIW, seed heads can be successfully suppressed by 3 applications of a mix of 0.35oz trinexapac-ethyl and 0.6oz Florel(ethephon) per thousand every two weeks , beginning two weeks before seed head season.
I'm by no means an "organic" person, but I'm not a big fan of messing with natural processes. There are already enough variables to contend with and I prefer not to add another (PGR). I also don't apply FAS, as that seems like painting the lawn to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Mightyquinn said:
I do it for the challenge of trying to have a great lawn and get it as close to perfection as I can. I like the fact that I can see the fruit of my labor (or the failure) and learn from it and use what I did the previous years to help me for the upcoming years. I like to be challenged as it makes you think and I also just like being in the yard. I also like to play golf which is something else that is hard to master but can be very rewarding when everything works out.
That too, and very true for me also.
 

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Ridgerunner said:
I'm by no means an "organic" person, but I'm not a big fan of messing with natural processes. There are already enough variables to contend with and I prefer not to add another (PGR).
I'm surprised, I would think you of all people would be all over it being it cuts your mowing in half :D. But you know, it's a tool, some people forge with a hydraulic press, others with a hammer - nothing wrong with either approach.

I think the biggest killer of passion for a hobby is when you put in a lot of heart, soul, labor and money into it, and time after time the results do not match the input. I've been through it - time after time my lawn that I worked so hard for has been wiped out during summer. If you can attack the problem from both ends - decrease labor while increasing results - it really helps bring back the joy of it all.
 

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Ridgerunner said:
Every year those of us who have KBG go through the same cycle. At least I do. Wait for the snow to melt and the KBG to wake up. It always wakes up unevenly and starts growing patchy. Cut low to remove the brown blades and warm up the soil. Mid-May, it's finally woken, filled in any small bare spots, and growing evenly. Raise HOC and it's looking sweet. Without fail, a week or two later, here come the seed heads and stalks. That'll last until Early summer when the heat and drought kicks in and the turf wants to go into some state of Summer dormancy. So, about 2 weeks of beautiful lawn until Fall. Is it just me?
I often look at the people here where I live that have St Augustine grass (we call it buffalo grass in Aus) or even the dreaded Kikuyu grass and think "is it all worth it?" Both are warm season grasses that never really go dormant here due to our mild winters. They mow it once a week in summer and once a month in winter and they're happy, their lawn requires almost no maintenance or care and it looks the same all year round. The thing that gets me back on track though, is that they're happy with mediocrity - I can't be! They reason you go through all that effort, year on year is because like the rest of us, you appreciate premium lawn, and would never be happy to settle for anything less. You would feel like you're cheating yourself. And what else is better to do in your spare time than play in your own 'patch of thatch'?

It's the same reason why when people look at us funny because we're mowing for the third time that week we just smile and give them a little wave. there's no point explaining it to them, they wouldn't get it anyway. Keep doing what you're doing, and enjoy it!
 

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This does not explain why we started doing this but can be a justification: we are doing our part to leave a bit of earth in better condition for whoever will live here in the future. Despite what the anti-lawn proponents say, turfgrass has many benefits. Think of all the cooling it does, the erosion it prevents, etc. Other ground covers (like weeds) would do that too, so to use that justification (our efforts now make things better for the future), we also need to make sure we're working to make the soil as healthy as possible. And while we're thinking about this, let us also be grateful that we live where we do and have grass at all. And that we have resources to be able to treat grass as a hobby. We are lucky in so many ways.
 
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