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Tifgrand—7,500 sq/ft—Baroness LM56
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It does look kind of like Goosegrass, you will need something labeled for grassy weeds.
 

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I'm not an expert of weed ID. However, my Mom's yard was infested with goosegrass. Goosegrass differs from crabgrass on the seed heads, as well as the base looking like a wagon wheel. She tired all different kinds of treatments and the only one that worked for her was to hand pull them out. If it is goosegrass then the roots are shallow and are able to extract by hand without leaving too much of the root system in play.

I don't have any experience with Celsius, but that may be an option as well. I'm sure others will chime in.
 

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Tifgrand—7,500 sq/ft—Baroness LM56
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I don't see Goosegrass on the label but it might go by another name. I don't see how Celsius couldn't kill it unless it was a Sedge of some sort.
 

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That is definitely goosegrass.

Quinclorac doesn't touch it.

You need to find something with Sulfentrazone. Depot and Lowe's both carry an ortho southern weed killer with that as an ingredient. It will take multiple sprays to get rid of it.

As a side note, goosegrass loves compacted soil. It's telling you something. Aerate, spray Sulfentrazone, and get on a PreM program and you will be in the clear in no time.
Goosegrass is one of the fastest spreading weeds you can get due to the thousand of seeds produced by a single stalk so it can be very frustrating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
southernguy311 said:
That is definitely goosegrass.

Quinclorac doesn't touch it.

You need to find something with Sulfentrazone. Depot and Lowe's both carry an ortho southern weed killer with that as an ingredient. It will take multiple sprays to get rid of it.

As a side note, goosegrass loves compacted soil. It's telling you something. Aerate, spray Sulfentrazone, and get on a PreM program and you will be in the clear in no time.
Goosegrass is one of the fastest spreading weeds you can get due to the thousand of seeds produced by a single stalk so it can be very frustrating.
Thanks for the identification. I actually picked up some Dismiss (Sulfentrazone) last month for the nutsedge. I guess the Scotts (pendimethalin) didn't work for me on the Goosegrass. I have since picked up some prodiamine for future pre-m.

Matt
 

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Tifgrand—7,500 sq/ft—Baroness LM56
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Movingshrub said:
Tribute total would also be a contender for post emergent. I am assuming you have Bermuda turfgrass. Also, oxadiazon is allegedly the best Pre-em for goosegrass.
Tribute Total is WAY expensive for what you get, I'll give you that it's nice to have it kill everything in one bottle but I don't think the cost justifies it especially for a homeowner. $350 for a 6oz. bottle is a little ridiculous. You could buy Celsius and Certainty for half that price and get the same kind of control and they would last a lot longer.
 

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Mightyquinn said:
Movingshrub said:
Tribute total would also be a contender for post emergent. I am assuming you have Bermuda turfgrass. Also, oxadiazon is allegedly the best Pre-em for goosegrass.
Tribute Total is WAY expensive for what you get, I'll give you that it's nice to have it kill everything in one bottle but I don't think the cost justifies it especially for a homeowner. $350 for a 6oz. bottle is a little ridiculous. You could buy Celsius and Certainty for half that price and get the same kind of control and they would last a lot longer.
I absolutely concur with you; just providing the info. With that being said, I used the University of Tennessee's mobile weed manual. If you put in your turfgrass, whether seeking a pre or post emergent, and the weed you are trying to control, the manual provides a list of options and their respective effectiveness.

http://www.mobileweedmanual.com/default.aspx

 

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Tifgrand—7,500 sq/ft—Baroness LM56
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Movingshrub said:
Mightyquinn said:
Movingshrub said:
Tribute total would also be a contender for post emergent. I am assuming you have Bermuda turfgrass. Also, oxadiazon is allegedly the best Pre-em for goosegrass.
Tribute Total is WAY expensive for what you get, I'll give you that it's nice to have it kill everything in one bottle but I don't think the cost justifies it especially for a homeowner. $350 for a 6oz. bottle is a little ridiculous. You could buy Celsius and Certainty for half that price and get the same kind of control and they would last a lot longer.
I absolutely concur with you; just providing the info. With that being said, I used the University of Tennessee's mobile weed manual. If you put in your turfgrass, whether seeking a pre or post emergent, and the weed you are trying to control, the manual provides a list of options and their respective effectiveness.

http://www.mobileweedmanual.com/default.aspx

That is a pretty neat tool, thanks for sharing :thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Tellycoleman said:
This is 5 days post Quicksilver on my Goosgrass.
Literally 9 drops of quick silver in 1 gallon of water.
Bermuda is a little mad but not dead.
Interesting, it looks like Carfentrazone (Quicksilver) and Sulfentrazone (Dismiss) are from the same chemical family. But Sulfentazone has more soil activity and is great at killing Sedges. Where Carfentrazone has more activity against broadleaf weeds.

I end up using MSMA on my Goosegrass. I sprayed two days ago and I'm seeing great activity from the MSMA. I'll try to post my results in the next few days to compare.
 

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Morning, all!

QUESTION: can any of you tell me what the U of TN mobile weed manual is referring to (what is meant by "sequentially") under the following "Remarks and Precautions" for using EITHER SpeedZone +/or SpeedZoneSOUTHern against crabgrass?

<snip>"When used for postemergence goosegrass contol, this herbicide must be applied sequentially to be effective. Turfgrass competition in treated areas will improve performance."<end-snip>

I am going to read the labels FOR BOTH SpeedZone AND SpeedZoneSOUTHern thoroughly (making a second pot of coffee, right now! :) but, at the same time I thought I'd inquire here - of any of you who've actually dealt with goosegrass successfully OR who have actual experience with SpeedZone against goosegrass - to see if I am (am I?) correct in my assumption all they are referring to is a 2nd (possibly a 3rd) re-application 7- or 10- to 14- days after the preceding spray? Does that sound right?

As I type this I realize I may be reading too much into the term "sequentially" and it is likely I am since, as I mention in another thread, I have been blindsided by goosegrass. I really am extremely thankful for this thread and particularly grateful for that U of Tenn "mobile weed manual" , movingshrub, THANK YOU!

I have been pretty anxiously researching the most effective solution as our yard will be used for at least one wedding later this year and even though thoughts of "a thousand brown spots" across sections of the yard are nerve-racking, I am so committed to eradicating these goose spots that I was actually on the verge of Glysophate-ing each one. (Saying, "To h_ll with it," and just hoping the surrounding tall and fine fescue would "fill-in" the brown spots (particularly as I'll be using plant growth regulators in these same areas, starting in a month or so ...)

Up until a moment ago I was somewhat disheartened over the prospect of another "couple hundred dollars for a couple ounces of liquid yarden gold" appearing as a line item on our 2018 household budget (again, so soon after I stocked up on what I thought was everything I needed to last me this year and we'll into next!)

AND THEN (thanks to that U of TN mobile weed manual, movingshrub! :thumbup: ) I discover perhaps the best solution is something I already have an ample amount of leftover from 2015 - SpeedZone! (NOTE to differentiate from SpeedZoneSOUTHern) It has been stored carefully so, I intend to try that first, before resorting to "the nuclear option" of Glysophate ...

UPDATES: well, on one hand, it is interesting that the U of TN mobile weed manual stresses the need for sequential applications of EITHER SpeedZone +/or SpeedZoneSOUTHern for goosegrass but, whereas the actual label for SpeedZoneSOUTHern only says a second app. "may" be needed

NOTE: that the actual term "goosegrass" only appears once across the entire SpeedZoneSOUTHern label WHILE neither the term "goosegrass" or even "grassy" show up AT ALL anywhere on the label for SpeedZone

On the other hand, the SpeedZoneSOUTHern label specifically states DO NOT APPLY MORE THAN TWO (2) SPOT TREATMENTS PER YEAR ... and ... A MINIMUM OF 30 DAYS IS REQUIRED BETWEEN APPLICATIONS" so, that settles that (I tend to follow labels to the letter) ...

On the plus side, getting my first app. down today will put my second spray around the second week of May - and thus juuuuuuuuust ahead of temps so high that the surrounding turf would be stressed (I do recall SpeedZone is best avoided when TTTF is stressed whether the stress is caused by heat or cold or drought or over-irrigation.)

So, fingers crossed, for better or for worse, Here We Go!!!!!
 

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Well, I am glad I like to read chemical labels!

The labels for SpeedZone vs SpeedZoneSOUTHern are VERY MUCH DIFFERENT and a reminder to me as to the importance of reading labels, thoroughly (and not ASSuming as I occassionally am wont to do! :)

I do find it interesting that SpeedZone actually contains SIGNIFICANTLY MORE of all the same FOURactive ingredients as SpeedZoneSOUTHern (actually, 3 of the 4 active ingredients SpeedZone are double the concentrations in SpeedZoneSOUTHern) and yet "goosegrass" and "grassy weeds" are only mentioned on the label of the lower concentration SpeedZoneSOUTHern label ...

I do remember one workshop I attended mentioning the differentiation between the SpeedZone vs the SpeedZone"Southern" mix was in part due to the higher concentrations of ester in the former and therefore increased risk of phytotoxicity in the hotter, southern climes. (I'm in a transition zone in the higher elevations of foothills to the Great Smokies and, being far enough south to experience "southern weeds" it's cool enough here that I've had success limiting my use of SpeedZone to when temps are above 50^F and lower than 80^F and the turf is not otherwise stressed by drought or over irrigation.)
 

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Where is the part that says multiple apps required? I went and looked it up on the UT tool and didn't see it.

Regarding sequential apps, I'd assume that means 2-3 weeks later, until dead.

Speed zone is basically three way plus quicksilver.
 

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Speedzone Southern uses a lower rate of the Phenoxy herbicides but keeps the Carfentrazone up. That is how it may be safely applied under certain conditions to Centipede and St Augustine. Speedzone Red, the Northern grass formula is for cool season grasses and Bermuda or Zoysia only. The amount of 2,4-D applied in that formula will stress and possibly kill Centipede or St Augustine.

by high leverage » Fri Jun 30, 2017 7:20 am

Tellycoleman wrote: ↑
Fri Jun 30, 2017 7:01 am
This is 5 days post Quicksilver on my Goosgrass.
Literally 9 drops of quick silver in 1 gallon of water.
Bermuda is a little mad but not dead.
Image

Interesting, it looks like Carfentrazone (Quicksilver) and Sulfentrazone (Dismiss) are from the same chemical family. But Sulfentazone has more soil activity and is great at killing Sedges. Where Carfentrazone has more activity against broadleaf weeds.

I end up using MSMA on my Goosegrass. I sprayed two days ago and I'm seeing great activity from the MSMA. I'll try to post my results in the next few days to compare.
I deal with Goosegrass on a regular basis in my area. You all have the good fortune of several months of frost and ice to keep it from becoming perennial.
MSMA+either SImazine or else Sencor(Metribuzin) were the long time standards for control. Then came Revolver. Thanks to golf courses not using it effectively and as part of a comprehensive program including preemergent herbicides, I have Revolver resistant Goosegrass here. There is also RoundUp resistant Goosegrass as well. Not the golf courses fault, I do not think, more like everyone else using Glyphosate to the exclusion of all other non crop herbicides.

When Goosegrass is a problem, I suggest split applications of Prodiamine or else Specticle. The amount needed is stressful to the turf if applied all at once. On emerged Goosegrass, I start with a Revolver +Dismiss application or else Speedzone Southern + Revolver application. Survivors of that are treated with Tenacity + Sencor or Simazine, or else Pylex+Sencor. These two treatments are not to be used on Zoysia. But Zoysia may be treated with Fusilade + Triclopyr. Anything living through that is spot treated with Fusilade + high rate RoundUp.

I do not even mention MSMA, because ALL pesticides are tracked by the Hawaii DOA from the time they come off the ship to the final consumer if it is a commercial product. Therefore, no one will sell MSMA to you unless you are a golf course because they are breaking the law to sell it and you are buying it.
 
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