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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
**The images should be working now**

So last Autumn (fall) I planted Penncross bentgrass in my front yard (My Avatar is my front yard at its best). I went with Bentgrass for a couple of reasons; 1 - I wanted a fine blade lawn that I could mow low with my reel mower, 2 - It was too late in the season to sod bermuda, and 3 - A cool season grass would allow me to mow lawn in winter when my Bermuda in the backyard goes dormant.

I did my research and I settled on either 007, Dominant or Tyee Bentgrass. Unfortunately, getting the amount I wanted was just too hard as no one would sell me less than 25lb. So I needed to settle for Penncross. However seeing as the Average temperatures in Adelaide range from 60 degrees in winter to 85 degrees in summer (although the temperature is often pushing 110 here in February and we regularly get weeks of 100+), I didn't think Penncross would cut it. I was right. Although I was able to nurse it through the heat, I still had close to 20% die off.

So I decided to get back on the hunt and eventually I managed to get a seed company to break a bag and sell me the amount I wanted. I picked Tyee Bentgrass for its superior heat tolerance.

I sprayed off the old lawn


Raked up the old lawn and threw it away


Today I was able to add 2 tonnes of 80/20 sandy loam, rolled and level out with a straight edge (as best I could)


And finally I fertilised and seeded


I used a starter fertiliser from "The Andersons" especially designed for fine blade lawns. The Analysis is 12-11-7

I'll post progress shots as I go
 

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Bermudagrass, 3.75 acres, Arkansas
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Great story - I'm anxious to follow your progress! Most of us are warm season turf guys, but I'll go out on a limb and say we all enjoy anything that involves a project and a lawn. :thumbup:

Thanks for sharing!
 

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Lawn Nut said:
A cool season grass would allow me to mow lawn in winter when my Bermuda in the backyard goes dormant.
It's funny to me how some people pay other people to mow their lawn so they can spend their time doing "other things"; and then there are people like us... people who specifically install an "off-season" lawn just so we can mow year round. :D

Lawn Nut said:
However seeing as the Average temperatures in Adelaide range from 60 degrees in winter to 85 degrees in summer (although the temperature is often pushing 110 here in February and we regularly get weeks of 100+)
I still have to read things like this twice. Although it occasionally gets up into the 80's here in February, that's not the norm. Seeing that it gets to 100+ on your side of the world always reminds me how big this world is.

On another note, perhaps I should look at saving up for a Winter home in Australia just so I can mow down there when my Bermuda lawn goes dormant. :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ware said:
Great story - I'm anxious to follow your progress! Most of us are warm season turf guys, but I'll go out on a limb and say we all enjoy anything that involves a project and a lawn. :thumbup:

Thanks for sharing!
I must admit, I prefer warm season grass too but I wanted to have my cake and eat it too! :)

dfw_pilot said:
Thanks for sharing this, Lawn Nut. I'm excited to follow your progress. Also, happy birthday <two days late due to the dateline>.
Thanks for that!

Wes said:
Lawn Nut said:
A cool season grass would allow me to mow lawn in winter when my Bermuda in the backyard goes dormant.
It's funny to me how some people pay other people to mow their lawn so they can spend their time doing "other things"; and then there are people like us... people who specifically install an "off-season" lawn just so we can mow year round. :D

Lawn Nut said:
However seeing as the Average temperatures in Adelaide range from 60 degrees in winter to 85 degrees in summer (although the temperature is often pushing 110 here in February and we regularly get weeks of 100+)
I still have to read things like this twice. Although it occasionally gets up into the 80's here in February, that's not the norm. Seeing that it gets to 100+ on your side of the world always reminds me how big this world is.

On another note, perhaps I should look at saving up for a Winter home in Australia just so I can mow down there when my Bermuda lawn goes dormant. :lol:
I can't help myself! I have a 4 year old and an 18 month old at home. If i didn't find something to keep me both occupied (to keep me sane) and home (to keep the wife happy) all year round, I think I'd go crazy! And what could be better than the smell of freshly cut grass and striped lawn multiple times a week ;)

As for the weather, we're lucky here that our winter is fairly mild. Even my bermuda lasts well into winter without doing dormant where it gets full sun. Being a market gardener I keep a keen eye on the frost and we really only get a decent frost 4 or 5 times a year
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So overnight the first bit of lawn has popped its head up. I seeded late tuesday afternoon and by early Saturday morning it's begun to come up. 3 and a half days, I'm happy with that. Now just to nurse it through the 100 degrees that is forecasted for tomorrow and I'll be over the moon!

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ok so 24 hours after I first noticed the lawn coming through, two great things happened. The forecast for the weather today was reissued with a maximum temperature of 93. I know it's only 7 degrees lower but more importantly the forecast was for cloudy weather (originally it was 100 and sunny).

the other thing that happened was I woke up to a really nice coverage of lawn starting to come through



 

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Tifgrand—7,500 sq/ft—Baroness LM56
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Very nice Lawn Nut!!!! Looks like you are going to have a lawn back there in no time!

Are there any special treatments you are going to have to do since it's Bent grass, like fungicides and the like?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Given the dry conditions here in Adelaide fungus isn't a major concern, just something I'll have to keep an eye on and treat if necessary.

The biggest hurdle with bent is the high nitrogen requirement and the shallow root system. Combined they're a great recipe for excessive thatch build up. Tyee especially has a tendency to build a lot of thatch in the first 12 months, after that it shows no major difference to other bent varieties. With the Penncross I treated it every 7-10 days with a kelp/seaweed solution for root strength, plant vigour and as a wetting agent. I get it made up locally from an organic fertiliser producer. He makes us up a lot of products for the farm so is only too happy to make something for my lawn. Also he's originally from the UK, and has experience working with Bentgrass.

As long as I stick to a routine with fertilisation and watering I really don't think it's that much of a problem (the opposite actually!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So here we are at 7 Days



If you look at the picture below, I think i'm at least 2 full weeks ahead (maybe a little more) of where I was at last year with the Penncross



I've now cut the water by 25% as well. I'm doing 15 minutes of water every 6 hours down from 20 minutes
 
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